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Training To Your Genes: Endurance Bias

Posted 52 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

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Your power/endurance profile can give you a deep insight into the way to get the maximum results out of your training by adjusting to where you fall on the spectrum. This week, we focus on endurance bias and what this means for you.

Your power/endurance profile can give you a deep insight into the way to get the maximum results out of your training by adjusting to where you fall on the spectrum. This week, we focus on endurance bias and what this means for you.

When you first see your power/endurance profile it is important to note that this spectrum does not suggest that you’ll be better at power sports than endurance sports or vice versa. What it gives us an indication of is what your body is likely to adapt to in terms of body fat % decrease and muscle mass development from a genetically predisposed point of view.

In terms of response we mean: if you focused more on endurance activities you would improve/increase/maintain in muscle tone/very lean muscle mass with endurance based weight (high repetition weight) training and will have a greater fatigue resistance ability over a longer period of time. If you focused on power training- the response you would see is favourable muscle growth and great muscular speed, power and explosive development.

You’ll know that the insights that genetic testing can offer you can be invaluable in terms of your athletic fitness and training programme. You’re able to move away from the one-size-fits-all approach and tackle your training empowered by the knowledge about your genetic information that the DNA test gives you. The main aspect of the DNAFit fitness report includes an algorithm based on a combination of genes that tells you whether you respond better to power, endurance or mixed training.

What Does It Mean For Me?

Here we’ll be taking you through some of the best exercises to do if you’re an endurance responder but first, what exactly does this endurance response mean?

Having a better endurance response can give an indication that your muscles are designed for repetitive work like high repetition weight training or longer duration cardio sessions. Your genes predispose you to find it easier to do exercises that require large amounts of oxygen and a continuous state of workout and results in leaner muscle mass development compared to bulky muscle mass development. If you are an endurance responder then you’ll find that you achieve your best results when training with many reps, over the usual 8-10, with slightly lowered weight. Your body will also thrive on cardio exercises, which you can split into varying forms of intensity for longer durations.

Exercises

Running – it’s the most affordable exercise and you can do it anytime. The benefits include improving your cardiovascular system, strengthening muscles, burning calories and helping to build strong bones as it is a weight-bearing exercise. You don’t need any special equipment. Ideally just get appropriate running shoes.

Cycling – a good way to exercise and anyone can ride a bike. Benefits include the fact that it is low impact and causes less strain on your joints. It is also a good muscle workout because you use all of the major muscle groups in your lower body as you pedal. Cycling helps to increase stamina, strength and aerobic fitness.

Water aerobics – type of resistance training done in a swimming pool. Swimming is also a fantastic way to increase your endurance while training major muscle groups but water aerobics requires less intensity. While working out in the pool the water provides your body with resistance that will activate different muscle groups. Helps improve cardio, low impact on joints and it's fun because anyone, of any age, can do water aerobics. 

Zumba/spinning – is an interval training workout that varies between high intensity and low intensity. It is designed to get the heart rate up and boost your aerobic endurance. Sessions can last up to 60 min. 

Yoga/Pilates - Some might say that these exercises bring the body and the mind together. The general concepts of these activities include exercise, breathing and meditation. However it will also be counted as an endurance activity and can result in great core, balance and proprioception development and will stimulate the development of leaner muscle mass.

High repetition weight training - This is lifting a light to moderately heavy weight for a rep range of 14 to plus 20 per set. This sort of weight lifting session improves muscular endurance capacity more than muscular strength and power capacity but will still result in muscle size development!

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