Get your guide!

Receive our FREE 14-day guide, direct to your inbox, on how genetics impact every aspect of fitness and nutrition.

When we think of calorie counting we think of reducing the amount of food you eat every single meal, carefully measuring it on a mental scale and extending lunch breaks spent analysing how many calories every single item of food you aim to consume. When you look at it this way, it’s a very stressful experience. But it doesn’t have to be. There’s always more than one way to skin a cat, or, in this case, trim the fat.

When we think of calorie counting we think of reducing the amount of food you eat every single meal, carefully measuring it on a mental scale and extending lunch breaks spent analysing how many calories every single item of food you aim to consume. When you look at it this way, it’s a very stressful experience. But it doesn’t have to be. There’s always more than one way to skin a cat, or, in this case, trim the fat.

We have to eventually admit that not all of us are cut out for the maths involved with calorie counting, nor the precision. Focusing entirely on the calorie content of your meals cause you to associate food with stress, and completely take the enjoyment out of eating.

Reducing your calorie intake should not feel like starving yourself, and you can’t always trust food products to be accurate with their displayed calculations of nutritional information. You have to take it from a personalised perspective and know what your body needs. All of our bodies are different sizes and work in unique ways and this has to be taken into account when you’re weighing up what to eat.

 

Another important thing about calorie counting is that when you obsess over how much, you can get side-tracked from the what. If you’re on a calorie counting diet, it’s important to ensure you are not excluding foods that are essential to your body’s requirements. For the most part, all of us need to maintain a diet with a mix of protein, fats and carbohydrates. Shying away from fattier foods because of the amount of calories can be misguided, as these foods often serve as an easy way to stay full. Food is also meant to be enjoyed! Listen to your body, eat when you’re hungry and eat economically to get the best results.

In many instances, calorie counting still has its place. But it’s always better when you’re smart about it. Remember that for health, getting the right amount of essential nutrients from your food is as important as the amount of calories you’re consuming. Not all calories are created equal, and certain fatty, high calorie foods, such as avocados, are also packed with a great deal of nutrients.

 

Every diet should be personal and adjusted to your body’s needs. Genetics play a big part in your nutritional needs, as well as your dietary history and the amount of exercise you get every day. Diet and calorie counting doesn’t have to be torture. Your diet should work for you, not the other way round.

If you’ve ever tried a diet that’s not personalised to you, you’ll know that it can make you feel anything but healthy.

 

The best way to approach your nutrition is within a personalised framework, within the boundaries set by your goals, psychology, and genes. Eat foods you enjoy, but always be mindful of your portion sizes and what you’re putting into your body. Calorie counting is not necessarily dead, but it’s now understood that for many people, it’s not as simple as just trying to consume less. By bending the ‘rules’ and adjusting the standard approach to one that leaves you feeling satisfied and positive, you’ll find that dieting is not only beneficial but sooner or later – easy.

Tags:

Nutrition Diet Calories Genetics Nutrigenomics

Share:




Other Articles

Posted 507 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

Gene in Focus - Part 17: VEGF

This week, we look at a gene that plays a role in both the power/endurance and aerobic trainability aspect of our report. This gene is VEGF, and it creates Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor, which plays a role in the creation of new blood vessels. This is a useful adaptation to aerobic training, because more blood vessels around the muscle mean better, more efficient transport of oxygen, as well as fuel sources such as carbohydrates and fats, to the muscle; this in turn improves how well a person can use oxygen and exercise aerobically. When we exercise, our muscle cells quite often don’t get as much oxygen as they need. This causes the VEGF gene to be “turned on”, with transcription upregulated and more VEGF formed – leading to this increased growth of new blood vessels.

Read More

Posted 510 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

Alcohol and Diet - why there's more to it than just empty calories

The rise of clubs, bars serving craft everything, festivals and sports events have given rise to the modern drinking culture, with plenty of opportunities to binge. But if you put a premium on health, want to build muscle, lose weight or reduce the risk of diseases associated with regular alcohol consumption then reducing your intake can be beneficial. With social pressures, and the enjoyment factor, it’s unrealistic to expect to cut out alcohol all together, but these tips and tricks can give you some pointers to keep your consumption in check.

Read More


Get your guide!

Receive our FREE 14-day guide, direct to your inbox, on how genetics impact every aspect of fitness and nutrition.