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Gene in Focus - Part 11: CRP

Posted 551 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

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The next gene to be put under our spotlight is CRP. This gene affects both the aerobic trainability and recovery aspects of our report, as well as playing a role in the DNAFit Peak Performance algorithm. Small changes within this gene cause changes in the amount of CRP we would expect each person to have, both at baseline and following exercise. CRP stands for C-Reactive Protein, which is a marker for inflammation.

The next gene to be put under our spotlight is CRP. This gene affects both the aerobic trainability and recovery aspects of our report, as well as playing a role in the DNAFit Peak Performance algorithm. Small changes within this gene cause changes in the amount of CRP we would expect each person to have, both at baseline and following exercise. CRP stands for C-Reactive Protein, which is a marker for inflammation. The greater the amount of CRP a person has, typically the more inflammation they have. Research indicates that higher amounts of CRP are associated with lower levels of aerobic fitness (as measured by VO2max). Research typically shows that G allele carriers of the CRP SNP we are interested in will typically have higher levels of CRP both at baseline and after exercise, which could affect how much they will improve following aerobic endurance based training – typically we would expect smaller improvements in these people. The opposite is also true; A allele carriers of CRP will be more likely to see greater improvements in aerobic capacity, and better improvements from endurance training than G allele carriers.

 

CRP is also released after exercise, and again G allele carriers are likely to have a higher amount of CRP following exercise. This causes a greater amount of inflammation, which in turn means it can take longer for recovery to occur. Because of this, we will class people with at least one G allele as having a slower recovery speed than AA genotypes. The good news is that small changes in our diet can have a really positive effect on lowering CRP levels and improving recovery. A 2003 study looked at the effect of a supplement containing omega-3, vitamin E and polyphenols (nutrients found in fruits and vegetables) on CRP release following exercise. What the researchers found is the less CRP was released following exercise when the supplement was taken, and this helped recovery; those taking the supplement saw shorter recovery times. So, if we know you’re likely to have higher levels of CRP following exercise, we would recommend that you consume higher amount of antioxidants through fruits and vegetables, as well as fish oils, in order to improve your recovery speed.

 

In summary, a polymorphism within the CRP gene can affect how well you recover from exercise, as well as affecting improvements from exercise. The table below summarises the different CRP genotypes:

 

CRP genotype

Power-Endurance / VO2max

Recovery Speed

AA

Associated with lower levels of CRP, which in turn is associated with a better VO2max response to training

Associated with lower levels of inflammation after hard training sessions, leading to quicker recovery times.

AG

Intermediate CRP levels, and some benefits in VO2max response to training.

May experience moderately increased levels of inflammation following strenuous exercise. A longer rest period may be required between training sessions when compared to AA genotypes.

GG

Associated with higher levels of CRP, and therefore inflammation, following exercise. In turn, this is associated with a lower VO2max response to exercise.

May experience higher levels of inflammation after strenuous exercise. A longer rest period between training sessions may be required compared to A allele carriers.

 

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Gene in Focus Training Performance CPR Genetics Recovery

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