Menu

My Cart

Sign In

Register Kit

DNAFit Blog

Eating too much VS Eating too little

Posted 643 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

CategoriesTagsSearch

Food, we all love it, from limp, steamed green beans to thick, medium rare steaks with a pulse, there may be nothing more diverse but collectively loved than food in this world. We all know how great the perfect soft serve ice cream tastes, sprinkled with Oreos or a large popcorn from the movies covered in salt and butter, accompanied by an extra-large multi-flavoured slush is. It also goes without saying that if you want to keep trim, healthy and feeling great then you can’t indulge too much in all of this.

Food, we all love it, from limp, steamed green beans to thick, medium rare steaks with a pulse, there may be nothing more diverse but collectively loved than food in this world. We all know how great the perfect soft serve ice cream tastes, sprinkled with Oreos or a large popcorn from the movies covered in salt and butter, accompanied by an extra-large multi-flavoured slush is. It also goes without saying that if you want to keep trim, healthy and feeling great then you can’t indulge too much in all of this.

Whether you’re training and dieting so that you can lose a little weight for your upcoming holiday, or crave activity because you spend your days at a desk, food plays a massive role; it almost dictates every aspect people’s lives. While limiting your intake of unhealthy foods is good you should still feel in control and look forward to the foods that you’re consuming. Your diet should work in unison with your journey to achieve your goals, but diet doesn’t mean eating less, and this is where many people get confused and frustrated.

 

A question that everyone is going to ask themselves at some point during their training is whether they’re eating too much or eating too little and, if you are then what’s the big deal? Well, we’re going to clear a few things up for you…

 

If you are training plan is dedicated to ridding you of fat and sculpting a new, toned body then diets that promote counting your calories can be beneficial, but only for a short time. People who undergo highly restrictive diets often regain all the weight they had lost, if not more, upon cessation of the diet.  For sustainable weight loss, research has shown that the best strategy is to eat healthy food, and lots of it.

 

In order to perform at your best during training it is important to be properly nourished, and this means that by not eating, or undereating, you will be undermining the effectiveness of your workouts. Undereating has also been linked to feelings of depression, lethargy and eating disorders; by consuming insufficient calories, you could experience hunger pangs, crashes in energy levels and mood-swings. It’s a vicious cycle that could leave you frustrated from a lack of results. Simply put, obsessively reducing your food intake can be unhealthy, both physically and mentally.

 

Your calories need to complement your training, so keep an eye on how many you’re burning compared to how many you consume. Remember that while you’re training, what you’ve eaten is going to be used for energy, and while you recover those nutrients will be used for repairing and growing muscle tissue. Growing muscle means you may lose less weight overall, but you’ll look more toned and your metabolism will speed up!

 

Let’s get one thing straight, overeating is of course associated with obesity, but that is in the context of low activity levels, and calorie dense foods. Whereas the late night fast food stops you’re making are simply turning food into fat, when you’re training hard and consuming  good quality food, those nutrients are used to help you recover and grow. For optimal performance, the reality is that you need to eat well so your body can adapt to the stress you are throwing at it.

 

It’s important to remember that no matter how hard you train, a bad diet will catch up to you. You don’t have to be a health freak who sticks to a stringent diet for the rest of your life, we can’t all be superhumans, but if you want to achieve your fitness or weight goals then you have to realise that some foods, like processed foods high in trans fat, are always going to hold you back.

 

Overall, your target should be a balanced, healthy diet that suits you and complements your training regimen. Healthy food can be used to slim down or bulk up,  you just have to get to grips with your portion sizes. DNAFit’s Fitness Diet Pro will give you bespoke diet and fitness information that is catered to your genetic make up. With the results you’ll be empowered with invaluable personalised information, and suggestions on how to apply it to your training and diet. A balanced lifestyle that adheres to simple guidelines, with a bit of leeway, will have you taking the stairs without even thinking, and smiling a whole lot more. 

 

Tags:

Training Diet Overeating Undereating Nutrition Carbohydrates Fats

Share:




Other Articles

Posted 645 Days Ago in: Training, Genetics

Gene in Focus - Part 11: CRP

The next gene to be put under our spotlight is CRP. This gene affects both the aerobic trainability and recovery aspects of our report, as well as playing a role in the DNAFit Peak Performance algorithm. Small changes within this gene cause changes in the amount of CRP we would expect each person to have, both at baseline and following exercise. CRP stands for C-Reactive Protein, which is a marker for inflammation.

Read More

Posted 650 Days Ago in: Training

Beginners guide to exercising: Is gym really the only answer?

So you want to get fit but anyone you speak to always only mentions how well they’re lifting at gym or how the cardio they get from a spinning class or treadmill was killer. The thing is, the idea of having to go to a gym to reach your fitness potential is not appealing to you at all. The gym isn’t for everyone and although it makes getting into shape easier for a lot of people what you have to realise is that there’s nothing wrong with not wanting to go the gym route. Just like with your diet, there is no one-size-fits-all approach to optimum fitness and health.

Read More


Get your guide!

Receive our FREE 14-day guide, direct to your inbox, on how genetics impact every aspect of fitness and nutrition.

Get your guide!

Receive our FREE 14-day guide, direct to your inbox, on how genetics impact every aspect of fitness and nutrition.