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Trying to eat well isn’t extremely difficult but it does require a certain level of discipline, dedication and initially, a bit of extra effort to change your usual habits. It’s a big change and the best way to stick to it is to make it as easy as possible, without waking up in the morning and being unsure of what you’re going to eat today. Below we’re going to offer some solutions on how to hack your weekly eating habits and balance your diet out so that you’re going to be getting the most out of it!

Trying to eat well isn’t extremely difficult but it does require a certain level of discipline, dedication and initially, a bit of extra effort to change your usual habits.  

It’s a big change and the best way to stick to it is to make it as easy as possible, without waking up in the morning and being unsure of what you’re going to eat today.

Below we’re going to offer some solutions on how to hack your weekly eating habits and balance your diet out so that you’re going to be getting the most out of it!

 

1.     Prepare the entire week in advance

 

Your weekly meal plan is all about the preparation and planning before you’ve even eaten anything. If you’re busy and you don’t want things to be too difficult it might be a good idea to research few recipes and choose a few which will help you plan your meals.

You can even do this online and track your progress, while balancing portions by the nutrients you’re going to be getting from them in order to reach your health goals.

After having all the meals that you intend to eat over the course of a week in front of you then it’s time to actually make the food and cut out the effort of having to make it daily.

 

2.     Prepare balanced meals

 

You’ve diarised what you’re going to be eating and have a few interesting ideas incorporating nutritious foods . Now it’s time to make them!

In the beginning, it’s probably going to be easier to stick to the basics and select balanced meals that are easier to make and easy to store, as well as ones that can be made it big batches.

At first, sticking with easily prepared meals like oats for breakfast, grilled chicken salads for lunch, and some fish or meat with lots of vegetables for dinner, will help you adapt to your new diet without having to become a pro cook. You can always get a bit fancier with your recipes once you settle into the new pattern.

 

3.     Store it in portions

 

A great way to do this is to chop up more fruit and vegetables at once; making big salads, smoothies or ready-to-eat meals that can be stored in the freezer and thawed easily overnight.

The trick is to do as much as possible and store the foods so that it’s easily accessible. A common hurdle for people trying to stick to diets is the fact that it feels inconvenient, and the preparation can seem like a waste of time instead of grabbing that easy snack.

 

4.     Leave room for cheats

 

You can’t deny your cravings all of the time, and sometimes, it might do more harm than good. In fact, you’re more likely to stick to your diet in the long term if you have a small cheat snack once in a while, rather than going on a several day binge when you’re resolve finally cracks because you’ve been so strict with yourself for so long.

It’ll also help you relieve stress so give in, maybe once a week, and have a few slices of pizza before refocusing on your weekly task.

The truth is that in the beginning it’s going to be hard to adapt but after a while it’ll all become second nature, your meals with taste better and you’ll be comfortable with knowing the wants and needs of your body. 

 

5.     Take inspiration from everywhere

 

Make things exciting to keep on approaching your meal plan from a fresh perspective.

Look out for different ways you can use certain foods and experiment with flavours to find something that you like.

 

There’s nothing better than discovering your personal preference and being able to make it yourself, eat it, and feel confident in the knowledge that it’s actually really healthy.

Be inspired by friends, family and communities on the internet who have the same mindset as you and want to help each other. Not only will you build a support network but you’ll also discover great new ways to approach a healthy lifestyle.

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Meal prep Nutrition Diet Healthy eating

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